Tuesday, November 13, 2012

About E-Fu noodle (Yi, Yee Fu,Yi mein, Yee, Mee)


E-Fu, Yi, Yee Fu, Yi Mein, Yee, mee, cantonese noodle, fried egg noodle, noodles
E-Fu noodle
I can still remember my first time eating E-Fu noodles. I found them, homemade, in a small Chinese shop. I bought them because they looked so tasty with their golden yellow color and light structure, but I had really no idea how to prepare these large round patties of noodles (Although they are also sold in squares).

Deep fried egg noodle


I came to learn that E-Fu noodles are actually deep fried egg noodle, mostly eaten in the southern province of Guangdong and in Guangxi (China). E-Fu noodles were once created by the scholar Yi Bingshou during the Ganlong period (sometimes these noodles are referred to as “Yi noodles”).  Nowadays E-fu noodles are also popular in Singapore and Malaysia (known as Yee Mee).

Making E-Fu noodle

E-Fu, Yi, Yee Fu, Yi Mein, Yee, mee, cantonese noodle, fried egg noodle, noodles
E-Fu noodle
E-Fu noodles are dissimilar to other egg noodles because they’re fried. If you just fry your own egg noodles you will never obtain the result of the beautiful patties of E-Fu noodles. But, how is it made? Well, beaten eggs are mixed with wheat flour, salt and soda (carbonated) water. Noodles are formed of the dough, cooked, dried and finally deep fried.

Remarkable structure and taste


The first time I ate E-Fu noodle I was surprised by the chewy, spongy structure of the noodles, not even sure whether I liked it or not. I never had eaten noodles with a structure like that of E-Fu. The more I ate them, the better I liked them until I yearned from time to time for the chewy structure. The taste was also kind of different, richer, than that of other noodles, because of the oily taste caused by the frying process of the noodles.

Preparing E-Fu noodles



E-Fu, Yi, Yee Fu, Yi Mein, Yee, mee, cantonese noodle, fried egg noodle, noodles
E-Fu noodles
Going to my recipes I found out the noodles had to be cooked briefly and that they were especially suitable for braising. E-Fu noodles are often eaten at banquets or as a celebratory dish on birthdays, as the long noodle stands for a full and long life. E-Fu noodles are preferably eaten with mushrooms (straw mushrooms or other fresh mushrooms and dried shiitake), chives and tablespoon of oyster sauce, soy sauce, broth, Shaoxing wine and a dash of sesame oil. But E-fu noodles with shrimps and chives are also liked, and they can are also used for stir fry dishes or in soups. 




Substitute

No E-Fu noodle in your neighborhood, you can try pancit canton (loved by Philipinos) or, though quite different, Chinese egg noodles.

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